Facts/Stats

  • Two hundred ADA-compliant, single-space parking meters have been added on street and those spaces are reserved for use by vehicles displaying disability placards or license plates.
  • Approximately 10% of the total number of metered parking spaces within Phase 1 are reserved for use by vehicles displaying disability placards or license plates.
  • Phase 1 includes the area bounded by Franklin St., President St., Key Hwy., Light St., Conway and MLK, Jr. Blvd.
  • Usually 1-2 parking spaces per block are reserved for those with disability placards or license plates.
  • Studies show 1/3 of traffic congestion in downtown areas are comprised of cars looking for an available parking space.
  • Approximately 10% of Baltimore City residents qualify for a disability placard or license plate.
  • 2012-2013 parking surveys show that up to 100% of vehicles parked at on-street meters were displaying a disability placard or license plate (per block).
  • 2012-2013 parking survey results show that when over 30% of vehicles per block have disability placards, the average number of occupied parking spaces is 94%.
  • The ideal percentage of occupied parking spaces is 85% (1-2 available parking spaces per block).
  • When drivers looking for short-term parking can’t find on-street parking spaces, the alternative is a parking garage ($1-4 on street versus $10-15 off street).
  • As of July 10, 2014, meter payment is now required from vehicles displaying disability placards or license plates.
  • Allowing free parking to drivers displaying disability placards or license plates began when the Americans with Disabilities Act determined that the parking meters at the time were not ADA compliant. New Baltimore City parking meters, and the retrofitted EZ Park meters, meet ADA guidelines.
  • The policy of allowing free parking for vehicles displaying disability placards has been too tempting for some people without disabilities to resist, resulting in a large number of vehicles parking on-street for long periods of time, making it extremely difficult to find an available parking space.
  • 1,861 disability placards were lost or stolen in Baltimore City in 2013, according to the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration (MVA).
  • 8,282 disability placards were lost or stolen in Maryland in 2012, according to the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration (MVA).
  • With no free parking incentive, those who are using disability placards for free parking only (and not for accessible parking) for long time periods will park in less expensive parking spaces off-street, making more parking spaces available for all.